Your Questions About Weight Loss Plan For Breastfeeding Mothers

by Maricela on May 1, 2013

Helen asks…

i need to know more about gestational diabetes mellitus because my 1 hr glucose test was positive?

Maricela answers:

GDM, like other forms of diabetes, is defined as glucose intolerance, but with its first onset during pregnancy. Approximately 3.5% of non-Aboriginal women, and up to 18% of Aboriginal women will develop GDM.

Risk factors for developing this condition include:

• a previous diagnosis of GDM

• age over 35 years

• obesity

• a history of polycystic ovary syndrome

• hirsutism (excessive body and facial hair)

• acanthosis nigricans (a skin disorder characterized by the appearance of darkened patches of skin)

• being a member of a population considered to be at high risk for diabetes, including women of Aboriginal, Hispanic, South Asian, Asian or African descent.

Although some are at greater risk than others, the Canadian Diabetes Association 2003 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada recommend that all women be screened for GDM between 24 and 28 weeks’ gestation using a glucose tolerance test*. For women with multiple risk factors, this testing should be done during the first trimester, then again during the second and third trimesters, even if the first test is negative.

Prompt diagnosis of GDM is important, as it carries several risks to both mother and infant. For example, children born to mothers with GDM may be “macrosomic”, a medical term meaning “severely obese.” This poses a risk of trauma to both mother and baby during the delivery. Macrosomic babies have a higher risk of hypoglycemia after birth – a dangerously low blood glucose level – as well as severe breathing problems. They are also at higher risk for potential long-term obesity and glucose intolerance.

Although the diagnosis should be taken seriously, GDM can be managed by some of the same measures with which type 2 diabetes is managed.

The first step is to make lifestyle changes that can prevent or reverse both GDM and type 2 diabetes. These measures include nutritional therapy – which is best accomplished with the help of a dietician – to achieve what’s called euglycemia, or blood glucose balance. It’s important to ensure appropriate weight gain, but not weight loss, and adequate nutritional intake for both mother and baby. Exercise is encouraged, with the frequency and intensity of activity decided with your doctor based on your risk.

If reductions in blood glucose do not reach the recommended levels within two weeks with lifestyle changes, then certain types of insulin can be safely used in pregnancy.

Generally, glucose levels in women who have had GDM return to normal. However, these women do face an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life, so after the baby is delivered, a follow-up blood glucose test should be done within six months. To reduce the risk of developing diabetes in the future, women should be encouraged to:

Breastfeed. Breastfeeding been shown to reduce the risk for subsequent diabetes in the baby.

• Follow a healthy lifestyle.

• Be screened regularly for the development of type 2 diabetes, or impaired glucose tolerance, also known as “prediabetes”.

• Consult their physician when planning their next pregnancy to check blood glucose levels, and consider taking a folic acid supplement to ensure the best outcomes.

With prompt diagnosis and good management, women with GDM can expect to have a healthy pregnancy and a happy, healthy baby.

Steven asks…

Can I take diet tablets or appetite suppressants while breastfeeding?

I’m grossly overweight.. I gained an extra 4 stone while pregnant and I’m still 2 stone heavier than before – I was overweight before pregnancy! I realise I am overweight and this is very bad for my health.
I’m breastfeeding and really struggling to keep my weight the same / loose any. My appetite is huge! My stomach is never full. I eat healthy and exercise enough but eat too much and can’t stop myself!
Is there a way I can keep breastfeeding but take appetite suppressants or diet tablets?
Which ones are safe? I used to take hoodia gordonii but no idea if its safe or not

I don’t want to stop breastfeeding but have come close many times because of my weight.. 🙁

Maricela answers:

There is not a safe way to take these drugs and herbs while breastfeeding. Although thee is no direct connection between what you ingest and your breastmilk, diet aids and appetite suppressants, because of the way the work and what is in them, are not safe for you to take at this time.

What you can do is fill your stomach with fiber and fluids. Eat nice, big salads with lunch and dinner, and stick with whole grains rather than white flour and rice. Snack on fresh fruit. And drink water and plain or flavored seltzer between meals. Also, taking a nice long walk with the baby every day will help rev up your metabolism. It will also keep you out of the house and away from the kitchen!

You can definitely achieve your weight loss goals little by little. Weight Watchers has an excellent plan for breastfeeding mothers. But please don’t resort to pills and supplements right now.

Nancy asks…

Thoughtless comments from others during pregnancy…?

I don’t know about most of you ladies, but I have been feeling happy about my pregnancy but a little stressed on the weight gain and how to loose it afterwards.You think that people around you would be more understanding and motivational. Though in one day I had 2 comments, one from a good friend and 1 from my mother. One saying ” I will never get my body back to how it was” and another saying that “I will have to work out extra hard to be able to loose those extra pounds” These comments just killed my spirits and I got very down and sad.I hadn’t given up on my weight loss fight and have already got oraganized a “boot camp” through my gym 2 months after baby is born.. Have you ladies had negative words from people? It was so unexpected that it happened from my two closest people…

Maricela answers:

Dont worry. I lost all my pregnancy weight within 5-6 months of having my first, with the majority coming off the first 3 months. I do not exercise, although I should…and often mean to :). I gained 40 lbs with my pregnancy, too just to let you know. Of course within a month or two of getting it off, I got pregnant again, so only got to enjoy it for a short time lol, but I’m hoping it will come off fairly easy this time as well. If you are planning on breastfeeding, I think it really does help with weight loss too. I dont think you’ll have any trouble at all, it sounds like you are an active person to begin with and just caring for a newborn takes a lot of energy and therefore calories. Just remember, It takes 9 months to put it on and its not unreasonable to take 9 months for it to come back off. Your body goes through quite a bit! I’m sure you’ll do just fine. Congrats on the baby!!

Joseph asks…

Loose Weight FAST!!!!?

So here is the story: I had a baby about 5 months ago and I can’t seem to get rid of my pregnancy weight. I have tried going to the gym, but my husband is in the military so he is never home in time for me to go and I do not have anyone to watch my daughter. I have purchased some workout videos, but they are not working either. My mother-in-law (we do not get along) kept talking about how she was so skinny after she had my husband. She hasnt seen me since I was pregnant and I want to be back to my normal self so everyone is amazed. I am trying to find some kind of diet plan to help me lose weight fast without exercise and without any pills because I am breastfeeding. Any help is great.

Maricela answers:

Depends on how fast you want to lose the weight. I would suggest, since you are breast feeding that you stick to a healthy way to lose weight. There is tons of weight loss programs out there that promise to get you thin fast, but as soon as you get off of them you bounce back to the way it was before you lost all the weight. Sometimes worse.

My suggestion is to get on an eating plan and exercise schedule. The fact that you have some exercise programs at home is great because you can do them at home without needing a baby sitter. My wife has lost her “baby fat” from having two kids this way.

Now as far as your eating plan, I suggest an all natural solution. My wife and I take Shakeology which has over 70 natural ingredients, no artificial or chemical ingredients. It’s actually a meal replacement so we don’t have to buy lunch or dinner (one or the other) which saves us money. It helps stabilize out metabolism which nicely complements out workout schedule and melts the pounds like butter.

If you need help coming up with a strict health and fitness plan, shoot me an e-mail at made2run@beachbodycoach.com and I’d be glad to help you out.

Lisa asks…

Some questions for lactating mothers,or mothers who are breastfeeding?

1.How do you feel being a mother?
2.Do you know the advantages of breast feeding?Like?
3.How many times in a day do you breastfeed you child?
4.What dietary patterns are you following?
5.What changes have you noticed in yourself these days?
6.How do you take care of your personal hygiene,and that of your child?
7.In what kinds of clothes are you comfortable in feeding your child?
8.What are the traditions and customs that are followed in your family?
9.At what age do you plan to supplement breastfeed with other food or milk?
10.How do you feel breastfeeding acts as a strong bond between you and your child?
11.If you are a working mother,how do you manage it?
12.Why did you choose breast over formula feeding?
13.How has your partner felt and has he been supportive?
14.Did you go to any classes about breast feeding?
15. Was the hospital you delivered in breast feeding friendly?
16.Is your pediatrician breast feeding friendly?
17.What do you think about extended breast feeding?
18.Have you nursed in public, and if yes were you harassed about it?
19.What do you think about people who think nursing moms should either cover up or feed in the bathroom?

please try to answer as many as possible, at least 10.
I was given this assignment for my Development of Childhood Practical Class.
If you could please help,I would be extremely grateful 🙂
I am not going to “choose the best answer”,since all are very good.You helped me,thank you very much for it.

Maricela answers:

I’m not nursing anymore, but nursed my second for 15 months and my first for 6 months.

1..How do you feel being a mother?
Love it! But it’s stressful and frustrating by times. Happy and rewarding most of the time.

2.Do you know the advantages of breast feeding?Like?
Yes. Antibodies provided to baby to strengthen immune system, breastmilk contains everything a baby needs at every stage of devevlopment in exactly the right quantities/proportions, high fat content, strengthens mother-baby bonding, helps uterus shrink back to normal size faster, helps with post-pardum weight-loss, free, convenient, easy.

3.How many times in a day do you breastfeed you child?
Nursed both on demand. As newborns, as often as every half an hour. Once they got older, about every 3 hours. No set schedule, on demand.

4.What dietary patterns are you following?
None.

5.What changes have you noticed in yourself these days?
Weight loss.

6.How do you take care of your personal hygiene,and that of your child?
Same as everybody else – regular bathing, etc. Weird question!

7.In what kinds of clothes are you comfortable in feeding your child?
Any.

8.What are the traditions and customs that are followed in your family?
9.At what age do you plan to supplement breastfeed with other food or milk?
I introduced solids with my first at 5 months, and 8 months with my second.

10.How do you feel breastfeeding acts as a strong bond between you and your child?
Knowing that only I could provide breastmilk was bonding in itself. The act of nursing alone strengthens the bond unlike a bottle can. I have done both and I know!!!

11.If you are a working mother,how do you manage it?
My baby was 15 months when I returned to work. I nursed her in the morning and evening and before bed. But she weaned very shortly after I returned to work.

12.Why did you choose breast over formula feeding?
No brainer.

13.How has your partner felt and has he been supportive?
Yes, he was supportive.

14.Did you go to any classes about breast feeding?
Yes.

15. Was the hospital you delivered in breast feeding friendly?
Yes.

16.Is your pediatrician breast feeding friendly?
No. But I had a midwife so it didn’t matter.

17.What do you think about extended breast feeding?
All for it.

18.Have you nursed in public, and if yes were you harassed about it?
Yes, I nursed in public all thet ime. Never harrassed once. I don’t really think anyone ever knew what I was doing. To the casual on-looker, it just looks like a mom holding her baby.

19.What do you think about people who think nursing moms should either cover up or feed in the bathroom?
I think they have sexual hang-ups of their own. If they can’t handle seeing a woman nurse a baby, then perhaps they should stay home.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Leave a Comment

CommentLuv badge

Previous post:

Next post: